Tuesday, January 20, 2015

Invest a Day in Sharpening Your Parenting Skills


Would you like to parent from a calm, confident place that invites cooperation instead of confrontation?
Even when you know how you'd ideally like your family to operate, it can be challenging to make those intentions a reality.

You don't want to yell at your kids, yet you find yourself yelling. You want your kids to treat you with respect yet they talk back. You want to be on the same parenting page as your partner and yet you have very different approaches with the kids.
happy family walking together
Raising kids is not easy. In these classes you'll learn to set limits on inappropriate behavior and encourage cooperation. You'll have time to ask questions about specific challenges you are facing.
Space is limited. Register today through EvergreenHealth.com/classes.

Choice #1 - for parents with kids ages 1 to 5  
Dates: Saturday, February 7th, 9:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Location:  Evergreen Hospital, 12040 NE 128th Street, Kirkland, WA
Cost: $99/person or $149/couple

Description:
Parenting young children can be exhausting! Discover how to set limits on inappropriate behavior, respond to tantrums and whining, recognize developmentally appropriate behavior, encourage cooperation and enjoy more fun together.

 

Choice #2 - for parents with kids ages 6 to 12  
Dates: Saturday, February 14th, 9:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Location:  Evergreen Hospital, 12040 NE 128th Street, Kirkland, WA
Cost: $99/person or $149/couple

Description:
Discover how to parent your kids now in ways that typically produce fantastic teens instead of rebellious, self-destructive teens. Find out how to set reasonable, valuable consequences for your children's misbehavior, guide your kids to resolving their own conflicts, avoid power struggles and have more fun with your kids!

 
Choice #3 - for parents with kids ages 13 to 18  
Dates: Saturday, February 21st, 9:30 AM - 4:30 PM
Location:  Evergreen Hospital, 12040 NE 128th Street, Kirkland, WA
Cost: $99/person or $149/couple

Description:
Develop a parenting approach that matches your teen's growing independence. Discover how to move from confrontation to cooperation, set limits on inappropriate behavior, guide your teens to making healthy decisions and prepare them to successfully launch as young adults.

 
Choice #4 - for parents who can't attend these classes  
Learn from the comfort of your own home by taking an online parenting class for Ages 5 and Under, 6 to 12 or 13 to 18. Start today for only $59!

Please join me for the class that best fits your family. If you have any questions, feel free to call me at 425-770-1629.

Warm Regards,

     Kathy Slattengren, M. Ed.
     President, Priceless Parenting

P.S. If you know someone who might enjoy taking this class, please do me a favor and share a link to this page.

 

Thursday, January 8, 2015

Strong Feelings Make Kids' Communication Rocky

When something is troubling your kids, expect their strong feelings to make talking about it rocky. Focusing on the poor ways your child is communicating (eye rolls, attitude) will negatively escalate the situation like it does in this video.

Instead, try to connect with your child’s underlying feeling by saying something like “Hmm … it sounds like something upset you today.” After saying this, drop the conversation unless your child wants to continue. Plan to continue the conversation later on when your child is ready to talk about it.



Wednesday, January 7, 2015

Teaching Kids Healthy Ways to Express Their Feelings

Your kids will experience a wide range of emotions each day. They may feel elated one moment followed by disappointment in the next moment. Perhaps they are thrilled with the red helium balloon they’ve just been given, only to experience dismay when they forget to hold on and the balloon floats away. Or they may feel terrified in asking someone to the dance and then exhilarated when that person says yes.

Part of being human is experiencing all these different emotions. How your children learn to handle their feelings will affect their success in relationships and school.

Name That Feeling!

When your kids are young, they need your help in labeling their feelings. If your child is stomping his feet and snarling as he tries to zip up his jacket, you might comment “It looks like you are frustrated with trying to zip up your jacket. I feel frustrated too when things are hard to do.” Hearing this helps your child feel noticed while also learning a word to attach to his feelings.

Developing a vocabulary for describing feelings gives children words for their emotional experiences. Understanding their own feelings then allows them to appreciate other people’s feelings. Correctly reading other people’s feelings is essential for building relationships.

A chart with faces and labels can help children see the differences in feelings. A feelings chart can be used for kids to point to the face that best matches how they are currently feeling. Pictures that go along with stories are also a wonderful way to talk about what the character might be feeling.

Older kids are ready for a range of words to describe mild to strong feelings. Are they furious, angry or feeling slightly bugged? Identifying the feeling’s intensity is important in communicating and figuring out what action to take.

(finish reading "Teaching Kids Healthy Ways to Express Their Feelings" on Priceless Parenting)

Tuesday, January 6, 2015

Signs That Your Kids Have Too Much Power and You Need to Step Up to Parent

Is it possible for kids to have too much power? Yes! Your household is not healthy and safe if your children are in charge instead of you. When you set firm boundaries, your kids feel secure.

If you find yourself feeling out-of-control with your kids, you may have handed them too much control. How do you know if your kids have too much power? Here are some warning behaviors:
  • Your kids hit or push you.
  • Your kids are disrespectful to you.
  • Your kids do not listen to you.
  • Your kids get by with inappropriate behavior.
  • Your kids negotiate or whine to get what they want.
If any of these behaviors are familiar, it’s time to step up to your parenting role. You can be a loving authority figure in your family. If you’re not sure how to do this, taking one of Priceless Parenting 's online parenting classes is a great way to learn!

Tuesday, December 2, 2014

Modeling Appreciation for the Gift

I was so excited to receive this special gift. It was everything I ever wanted! When the gift arrived it was the most beautiful gift I’d ever seen. It simply sparkled like a shiny, brilliant star!

I immediately fell in love with my gift. Who cares that there was no gift receipt! I certainly would not be interested in returning it.

As I familiarized myself with the gift, I realized it was more intricate and complex than I imagined it would be. I couldn’t help but notice there were thousands of pages of instructions. How could it possibly be this complicated?

I soon realized that part of the complexity was because every single product was slightly different. Who designs a product like that? Honestly, it was ridiculous how much I had to read through to locate the one piece of information I needed.

One of the first things I wanted to figure out was how the silent mode worked. Guess what?

(finish reading the article on Priceless Parenting)

Monday, December 1, 2014

December Calendar for Kids

Are your kids excited for the holidays? You can print out this December calendar which they can decorate and mark the days of the special celebrations for your family.

Monday, November 17, 2014

Wild Behavior When Parents Are Not Around

A mom described how well her 5-year-old nephew, Jake, behaved when his parents were around. However, the minute they left, Jake took the opportunity to behave wildly. He seemed to have a lot of pent up behavior bursting to be released.

Most kids save their worst behavior for around their parents because their parents are safe. Their parents will love them and not abandon them regardless if they misbehave. Parents are often dismayed to learn that their child is an angel at school and feel like something must be wrong since their behavior is much worse at home. However, it's normal for kids to "hold it together" at school or someone else's house and then have their meltdowns at home.

Jake did just the opposite - he behaved wildly when his parents weren't around but was well behaved when they were around. Jake's behavior indicates he has not internalized his own reasons for behaving appropriately. He probably behaves appropriately at home due to the consequences of misbehaving. The problem is that it only works well if his parents or someone else is around to administer consequences.

Ideally Jake will learn to regulate his own behavior regardless of whether his parents are around or not. When the only reason kids have for behaving is to avoid punishment, they need to be policed to stay in line. Using a parenting approach that helps Jake learn from his mistakes rather than just learn to avoid being punished will help his behavior improve away from home.